du Houx limited edition signed prints

arrow222I try to bring the beauty, magic and mystery of nature to viewers by amplifying nature’s essence.

Scientists, innovators, and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her connective rhythms. But now society plugs us into the Internet, and while that can open doors, sometimes too much of being Internet-connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that are transformational. I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Sometimes when people look deeply into these images, they relax and find a tranquil place in the soul, as one would by taking time to be at peace in nature. At other times, the photographs can refresh, excite, and energize one’s soul, as if one were standing by a waterfall. The images have been said to be dreamlike, healing, Zen meditative, inspiring and thought provoking.

My technique uses movement to create a sense of wonder through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Everything within the viewfinder becomes visibly interconnected when objects merge with the motion of the camera as the image, the “lightgraph,” is taken.

Putting the images into categories was extremely challenging as everything is interconnected. Please enjoy the work and check back for more additions regularly added. All images are limited editions for sale and represent over 35 years of work.

TO VIEW: Please click on the thumbnail below to see a larger version of the art work.

 

Nature reveals herself

 

There are no boundaries in nature, with everyone and everything interconnected. Where a river stops cannot be defined, nor can the end of the sky. In my lightgraphs no objects have clearly defined borders as they merge their core essences together creating visual abstracts of light.

Continue reading

Maine’s mystical ships by Ramona du Houx – May 2016 exhibit

INSIGHTS

Seascapes

“Our bodies consist of the same proportion of water as the earth. We are creatures of the sea. The draw of the ocean has been written about time and again. There is something more vast and more mysterious about the sea than anything else on earth. It’s something similar to the vastness and mystery of the universe itself. Our planet is just one in our solar system which is connected by the vastness of space. Is the relationship we have with the ocean a microscopic reflection of the relationship our Earth has to space?” said Ramona du Houx.

“How people interact with the ocean, from feeling at one under sail with the winds at the back to simply watching waves lap the shores, transmits a calmness, a wholeness. That peace is something I wish to convey in my work.”

View original post

My day with a Blue Heron

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Herons are symbols of good luck and patience in many Native American tribes.

When the Sacred Waterbird, Blue Heron, comes to you in the Native American Totem tradition it gives you a lesson of self-reflection.

Heron “medicine” teaches us about the power of knowing ourselves so that we can discover our gifts and face our challenges.  We learn to accept all of our feelings and opinions and not to deny the emotions and thoughts that go with them.

The Blue Heron encourages us to follow our intuition and to take the empowering journey into self-realization. Continue reading

Parade of Sail in Maine by Ramona du Houx

Screen Shot 2016-07-20 at 12.39.57 PM“The ships take us away into another land, another place- somewhere we dream. With my “lightgraph” photographic art technique, started in 1979, I try to bring the beauty, magic and mystery of nature to viewers by amplifying nature’s essence. Sometimes that is expressed by how we interact with nature, like catching the perfect wind and sailing away,” stated Ramona.

Her Windjammer’s are also for sale at her new shop on Etsy called TradewindsAvetar . 

All images on Etsy are:

  • signed by the artist, Ramona du Houx.
  • Limited Editions
  • with free shipping inside USA.

 

 

Ramona du Houx is artist of the month at SugarWood Gallery

FARMINGTON — SugarWood Gallery Artist of the Month Ramona du Houx of Solon will be feted at an open house reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, July 1, during First Friday Art Walk.

The public is invited. Refreshments will be served.

Du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings. Many have said the images have a healing nature.

She is currently represented by Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan, and is a member of the Maine Artist Collaborative and the Harlow Gallery. Gallery Storks has produced an art book of her art called “Transformations — Revealing Nature’s Complex Balance.” Many of the photos on display are in the book.

Du Houx’s love for photography continues to be a lifetime affair. At age 12, she couldn’t be seen without a camera. By 18, she was teaching photography and industrial design at Colegio San Antonio Abad in Puerto Rico.

During college she worked with three New York City photographers. In 1979 she landed jobs to take political photographs of Sen. Ted Kennedy and President Jimmy Carter. The same year she discovered her “lightgraph” technique and held her first exhibit in Huntington, N.Y. She then took her lightgraph images to the Museum of Modern Art, where they were put on file.

The Zen nature of her work became obvious to her so she continued her studies in art and philosophy in Kyoto, Japan, while teaching. Her travels in the East led to numerous exhibits in Japan and a lifelong connection with the area.

Supermoon Dream

In England and Ireland, she explored the mythology of the region, while raising three children, ghost writing a novel, and forever taking photographs. After returning stateside to Maine, she started a publishing company with her husband and was hired as a consultant by a local artist. During this time she also explored more about the mysteries of motion in her lightgraph technique and wrote for newspapers. By 1998 she was given access to a color darkroom at the Lewiston Creative Photographic Art Center to print a backlog of work in exchange for advising the Center’s photography students.

In 2005 Ramona started a news magazine, “Maine Insights,” which continues to this day. By 2012 she decided to show more of her fine art and has exhibited around the world.

SugarWood Gallery is located at 248 Broadway. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Ramona du Houx’s new exhibit includes mystical images of Maine’s Windjammer fleet

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Article in Maine Insights

For the month of July the SugarWood Gallery, at 248 Broadway in Farmington, will feature the fine art photography of Ramona du Houx. The open house will be held on July 1st from 5pm-8pm, during Farmington’s First Friday Art Walk.

Ramona du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Some find them nostalgic and some mystical. Many have said the images have a healing nature.

“I try to bring the beauty, magic and mystery of nature to viewers by amplifying nature’s essence,” said Ramona, a Solon resident.

New work on display will include images of Maine’s Windjammer fleet under full sail.

Ramona is currently represented by Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan and is also a member of the Maine Artist Collaborative and the Harlow Gallery. Gallery Storks has produced an art book of Ramona’s art called: Transformations— Revealing nature’s complex balance. Some of the photos on display are featured in the book.

“Scientists, innovators, and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her connective rhythms. But now society plugs us into the Internet, and while that can open doors, sometimes too much of being Internet-connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that are transformational. I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves,” said Ramona.

Ramona uses the camera with a painter’s eye. The technique she discovered back in 1979, in New York, uses movement to create a sense of wonder through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Everything within the viewfinder becomes visibly interconnected when objects merge with the motion of the camera as the image, the “lightgraph,” is taken.

The photographic watercolor technique is always a challenge. “I never know exactly what the results will be, that’s the exciting part of the creation,” said Ramona.

 

Boat legends come to life in Maine

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Seascapes

Our bodies consist of the same proportion of water as the earth. We are creatures of the sea. The draw of the ocean has been written about time and again. There is something more vast and more mysterious about the sea than anything else on earth. It’s something similar to the vastness and mystery of the universe itself. Our planet is just one in our solar system which is connected by the vastness of space. Is the relationship we have with the ocean a microscopic reflection of the relationship our Earth has to space?

How people interact with the ocean, from feeling at one under sail with the winds at the back to simply watching waves lap the shores, transmits a calmness, a wholeness. That peace is something I wish to convey in my work.

Maine’s Portland art museum exhibits photographs of American Indians

Screen Shot 2016-02-27 at 10.58.51 AM“Selections from the North American Indian” by Edward Curtis will be exhibited at the Portland Museum of Art from February 26th through May 29. It includes 25 photos of Indians that Curtis shot between 1907 and 1930.

The faces of the portraits say so much.

The images were first included in a book project by Curtis, “The North American Indian.” Curtis documented Indians and native culture, primarily across the American West and the Pacific Northwest. He made more than 2,000 photogravures, and his research represented the most comprehensive effort at the time to document Indian culture. He visited more than 80 tribes.

Curtis was sometimes criticized for romanticizing Indians, often asking them to wear ceremonial dress and adornments that were accurate but presented out of context. On the other hand, his work was valuable for its scope and completeness, and Curtis earned high marks for his photographic artistry.

The Portland Museum has commentary by contemporary Maine Indian artists Brenda Moore-Mitchell, George Neptune and David Moses Bridges to accompany the photographs on display. Visitors can access their remarks through audio recordings in the gallery.

Science and art at Colby College

A novel art, science, and educational collaboration is underway between Colby College and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences. Six different professors in disciplines ranging from biology to the art and humanities have integrated a photographic exhibit of marine microbes, created by Bigelow Laboratory, into their curriculum this fall.

The exhibit is on display at Colby College through December 11, and culminates in a presentation of student-inspired work that evening at 5 pm in the Wormser Room at the college.
Among the offerings, the event is scheduled to feature a microbe-inspired dance, microbial marble sculptures, scientific discussion about the relevance of marine microbes to planetary balance, and instant DNA technology.

People at Work: The Low Wage Earners of Maine by Jeff Kirlin

Screen Shot 2015-10-03 at 10.53.07 AMScreen Shot 2015-10-03 at 10.53.24 AM

This documentary photographic series, People at Work: The Low Wage Earners of Maine, depicts some of our fellow neighbors who work for the state’s minimum wage of just $7.50 an hour. The dedicated photographer, Jeff Kirlin, works in his free time documenting them. This is just a sample from his series.

“The photography project was started after I was told by a person, in a position to help bring about a higher minimum wage, that he didn’t feel it was a real problem because it hasn’t been brought to his personal attention,” said Jeff, a speech therapist and Bangor based photographer. “This project is intended to give, not a voice, but a platform for those earning low wages and their supporters, and how their lives are affected by stagnant wages.”

View in more detail HERE.