March exhibit of du Houx: The Energy and Peace of Waterfalls

Every month Ramona hosts an exhibit in Solon and here on line. For March the exhibit is The Energy and Peace of Waterfalls.

Society moves at an ever-increasing pace; with cell phones and text messaging many people don’t take the time to look around them, to reflect. There is of course a time and place for these technologies, there is also a time and place for contemplation. Nature provides pools of wisdom in reflected objects if we take the time to look. Taking a moment or two to find stillness coupled with a rush of discovery energizes me in a balanced way. With these images I hope others will find that solace.

Water, soft and supple and rocks hard and unforgiving create a balance. They exist and form the nature of each-other. The water molds the stones, the rocks determine the waters flow. This relationship in nature we carry in our souls.

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When the ice age carved out our landscapes dramatic shifts occurred. Some were sharp, steep transitions where waterfalls were created. For me the energy from the ionizing water as it cascades over a waterfall clears my mind so I can look at challenges afresh. The rush of water awakens something deep within the soul. In my photographs I hope to convey that excited rush of creation with a balance of where the earth now resides.

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Reflections, Waterfall, Rocks – zen like images by Ramona du Houx

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Society moves at an ever-increasing pace; with cell phones and text messaging many people don’t take the time to look around them, to reflect. There is of course a time and place for these technologies, there is also a time and place for contemplation. Nature provides pools of wisdom in reflected objects if we take the time to look. Taking a moment or two to find stillness coupled with a rush of discovery energizes me in a balanced way. With these images I hope others will find that solace.

Water, soft and supple and rocks hard and unforgiving create a balance. They exist and form the nature of each-other. The water molds the stones, the rocks determine the waters flow. This relationship in nature we carry in our souls.

When the ice age carved out our landscapes dramatic shifts occurred. Some were sharp, steep transitions where waterfalls were created. For me the energy from the ionizing water as it cascades over a waterfall clears my mind so I can look at challenges afresh. The rush of water awakens something deep within the soul. In my photographs I hope to convey that excited rush of creation with a balance of where the earth now resides.

The story of The Golden Temple’s Tree Heart fine art photo by Ramona du Houx

Treeheart

Treeheart

For a year starting in 1980, I lived in Japan, spending the majority of my time in Kyoto. Everyday I would pass the Golden Temple, Kinkaku-ji, a Zen Buddhist shrine, on my way home to my home-stay family at the bottom of a mountain, where a stream ran out back through the garden. The same stream that goes through the Golden Temple. For months I had been promising myself that’d I’d spend time in the gardens of Kinkaku-ji, but never seemed to find the time.

Before I knew it New Year’s eve was upon us. My home-stay family adorned me in a traditional family kimono, and side by side with my home-stay sister, Yukika, we marched in a parade to a Shinto Shrine to celebrate our birthdays. You see, we both would turn 21 during the upcoming year, and by shinto tradition that is the year women come of age.

My obachan, home-stay grandmother, helped me put on the kimono. In Japanese she kept saying my breasts and hips were to large for the dress but with determination she’d make sure I could wear it. As she stretched the waist band around me I cringed, and I wondered how women ever tolerated corsets. At first I stumbled trying to maneuver in the sandals for the kimono restricted leg movement. After learning the correct way to walk, we set out on our journey. Yukika looked so graceful as she moved like the river’s flow. On the other hand I waddled like a penguin. Continue reading

The story behind du Houx’s art photo: Oak Maine

Oak Maine

Oak Maine

On a brilliant summer’s day in the late afternoon I went for a walk along the banks of the Kennebec River. The crystal waters beckoned me in and soon I found myself swimming upstream. Drying off on a rock I petted a vein that had quartz running through it. As I closed my eyes I let the sun bathe me, knowing one day six months from now I’d sit in the window and close my eyes letting the sun warm me when the temperatures outside would turn me into an ice sculpture.

Nature has a tremendous power to heal, to put our minds at ease and transform the mundane into the magical.

Picking up my camera I ambled up the ole railroad trail, content. Continue reading

du Houx limited edition signed prints

arrow222I try to bring the beauty, magic and mystery of nature to viewers by amplifying nature’s essence.

Scientists, innovators, and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her connective rhythms. But now society plugs us into the Internet, and while that can open doors, sometimes too much of being Internet-connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that are transformational. I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves.

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Sometimes when people look deeply into these images, they relax and find a tranquil place in the soul, as one would by taking time to be at peace in nature. At other times, the photographs can refresh, excite, and energize one’s soul, as if one were standing by a waterfall. The images have been said to be dreamlike, healing, Zen meditative, inspiring and thought provoking.

My technique uses movement to create a sense of wonder through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Everything within the viewfinder becomes visibly interconnected when objects merge with the motion of the camera as the image, the “lightgraph,” is taken.

Putting the images into categories was extremely challenging as everything is interconnected. Please enjoy the work and check back for more additions regularly added. All images are limited editions for sale and represent over 35 years of work.

TO VIEW: Please click on the thumbnail below to see a larger version of the art work.

 

Nature reveals herself

 

There are no boundaries in nature, with everyone and everything interconnected. Where a river stops cannot be defined, nor can the end of the sky. In my lightgraphs no objects have clearly defined borders as they merge their core essences together creating visual abstracts of light.

Continue reading

The art and the artist

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“I’ve been in love with photography since I was twelve. In college I took the apprentice route with different New York photographers, which led to working as a political photographer while pursuing fine art photography.

“The relationship between people around the world with their natural surroundings is a continuing theme of mine. The resilience of the human spirit emerges in amazing ways. Continue reading

Find Ramona du Houx’s lightgraph photo you are looking for

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Nature is complex yet incredibly logical. In order for science to understand this complexity and to discover more about the natural world they developed categories, aware that many subjects would overlap.

In order for the artist in me to understand more about my art I needed a way to identify why I am attracted to certain subjects. Creating categories, that too overlap, has enabled me to understand more about my art.

I’ve attempted to display my work with the following categories: Continue reading