The Zen peace of Maine’s Western Mountains depicted in Ramona du Houx’s images

Western Mts.

Western Mts.

If you haven’t been to Central Maine, you are missing out on some of the most majestic and peaceful mountains anywhere. They remind me of the mythologies about giant dragons sleeping in fields thus transforming them into hills and mountain ranges. Their backs form the mountains. The long tails of these majestic beasts stretch throughout Maine up into Canada. They are, of course, part of the Appalachian Trail system. As their bodies sleep in mountain ranges, their spirits roam the night sky in constellations. Continue reading

The story of The Golden Temple’s Tree Heart fine art photo by Ramona du Houx

Treeheart

Treeheart

For a year starting in 1980, I lived in Japan, spending the majority of my time in Kyoto. Everyday I would pass the Golden Temple, Kinkaku-ji, a Zen Buddhist shrine, on my way home to my home-stay family at the bottom of a mountain, where a stream ran out back through the garden. The same stream that goes through the Golden Temple. For months I had been promising myself that’d I’d spend time in the gardens of Kinkaku-ji, but never seemed to find the time.

Before I knew it New Year’s eve was upon us. My home-stay family adorned me in a traditional family kimono, and side by side with my home-stay sister, Yukika, we marched in a parade to a Shinto Shrine to celebrate our birthdays. You see, we both would turn 21 during the upcoming year, and by shinto tradition that is the year women come of age.

My obachan, home-stay grandmother, helped me put on the kimono. In Japanese she kept saying my breasts and hips were to large for the dress but with determination she’d make sure I could wear it. As she stretched the waist band around me I cringed, and I wondered how women ever tolerated corsets. At first I stumbled trying to maneuver in the sandals for the kimono restricted leg movement. After learning the correct way to walk, we set out on our journey. Yukika looked so graceful as she moved like the river’s flow. On the other hand I waddled like a penguin. Continue reading

du Houx limited edition signed prints

arrow222I try to bring the beauty, magic and mystery of nature to viewers by amplifying nature’s essence.

Scientists, innovators, and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her connective rhythms. But now society plugs us into the Internet, and while that can open doors, sometimes too much of being Internet-connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that are transformational. I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves.

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Sometimes when people look deeply into these images, they relax and find a tranquil place in the soul, as one would by taking time to be at peace in nature. At other times, the photographs can refresh, excite, and energize one’s soul, as if one were standing by a waterfall. The images have been said to be dreamlike, healing, Zen meditative, inspiring and thought provoking.

My technique uses movement to create a sense of wonder through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Everything within the viewfinder becomes visibly interconnected when objects merge with the motion of the camera as the image, the “lightgraph,” is taken.

Putting the images into categories was extremely challenging as everything is interconnected. Please enjoy the work and check back for more additions regularly added. All images are limited editions for sale and represent over 35 years of work.

TO VIEW: Please click on the thumbnail below to see a larger version of the art work.

 

Nature reveals herself

 

There are no boundaries in nature, with everyone and everything interconnected. Where a river stops cannot be defined, nor can the end of the sky. In my lightgraphs no objects have clearly defined borders as they merge their core essences together creating visual abstracts of light.

Continue reading

Sun Journal reports on Tokyo and Portland du Houx exhibits

Maine artist concurrently exhibiting in Tokyo and Portland The article from the Sun Journal, Thursday, May 8, 2014

Transformation Flight

Transformation Flight

PORTLAND — Maine artist, Ramona du Houx, is concurrently exhibiting Maine photos in Tokyo, Japan from May 7-19 and at the Constellation Gallery, in Portland for the month of May.

A sloop, “Maine Sails,” photographed by du Houx off Belfast, merges into its surroundings showing how it’s geometry is reflected in nature. Du Houx’s photographic fine art in the exhibit tells the story of a bird who transforms as the avian experiences the seasons.

“Modern society plugs us into the Internet and that can open doors but sometimes too much of being Internet connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that can be transformational. I want to show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves,” said du Houx. Continue reading

Investing in the next big name artist: Ramona du Houx

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By Lisa Crothers, July, 28th, 2014

How do we spend wisely considering factors like: a still unstable economy, sky-high gas prices, droughts causing food supplies to increase – only to name a few things here. We still want to make investments and decorate our homes, so what can we do if we cannot head to Christies and bid on that Monet? As patrons of the Arts and Humanities commitment and investment are the grounding principles. A few years ago when I became invested in the arts community, I took down all of the “reproduced art” in my living space, recommitting myself to original art. My walls are still pretty bare, but the satisfaction is in knowing that over the years, piece by piece, careful selection by selection, I will have invested in the arts and the economy.

What does that have to do with Investing?

Invest in local art!

It goes back to spending wisely. Investments in original art can often bring in a nice return. I am pasting a link here for a great article written in The Telegraph – “Investing in art: how to make money by discovering the next Monet”

Where do I find artist to Invest in?

Finding artists can be easy if you know where to look. Finding art you love and can see sustaining itself in the future takes more time – but you can do it. A great place to start meeting artists is local art shows and festivals. Artists love to talk about their work and want to sell to people who care about their pieces; they want to know their work is going to a good home. You also want to invest in artists who care about their work and who you know will be making art for a long time.

One one my favorite places to meet artists is the famous Art Walks. Cities large and small across the country have established calendars and galleries who participate in such events. Many times the displaying artists can be found enjoying the positive energy.

A great Art Walk I have mentioned on this site before is the First Friday Art Walk in Portland, Maine. This Art Walk tends to be more like a festival with different types of music on street corners, sidewalk art sales and refreshments in many of the participating galleries. What you will also find at the August 1st Portland Art Walk is Art at The Constellation Gallery, 511 Congress Street Portland, Maine – by a spectacular artist worth investing in:Ramona du Houx

RAMONA DU HOUX takes photographs with a painter’s eye. The technique she discovered in 1979 uses the camera’s motion to create a sense of being personally closer to an object through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons by capturing the energy of nature. People, animals, building, landscapes … literally everything becomes visibly interconnected as they merge in, what she calls, a Lightgraph. Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan, represents Ramona’s work. She’s exhibited her fine art photography internationally and in cities along the US Eastern seaboard, including New York.

“The Greek philosopher Heraclitus wrote, ‘You can’t step into the same river, twice.’ Today, most of us are too busy to contemplate how much nature’s motion surrounds us, or is within us. We don’t normally see how interconnected rhythms of nature are apart of us. Modern society plugs us into the Internet, and that can open doors, but sometimes too much of being Internet connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that can be transformational. Scientists, innovators and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her interconnected rhythms,” said Ramona. “I would like to show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves.”

Lisa Crothers is an independent community educator, passionately advocating for the arts & humanities. She teaches courses in both English and the Humanities at the higher education level. Her ongoing insights about Maine art can be found here.

Sun Journal reports on Ramona du Houx’s exhibits in Tokyo and Portland

The following article appeared in the Sun Journal, Thursday, May 8, 2014:

Maine artist concurrently exhibiting in Tokyo, Portland

Headline in the Sun Journal about the exhibits in Tokyo and Portland

Headline in the Sun Journal about the exhibits in Tokyo and Portland

PORTLAND — Maine artist, Ramona du Houx, is concurrently exhibiting Maine photos in Tokyo, Japan from May 7-19 and at the Constellation Gallery, in Portland for the month of May.

Du Houx’s photographic fine art in the exhibit tells the story of a bird who transforms as the avian experiences the seasons.

“Modern society plugs us into the Internet and that can open doors but sometimes too much of being Internet connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that can be transformational. I want to show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves,” said du Houx.

In du Houx’s story a bird first sees Lupine’s Dance in spring and wants to uncover more about nature’s mysteries. The young bird awakens to nature’s energy more in the summer, shown in the photo Wake Up. In fall the bird begins a Journey of discovery and in winter she realizes that all life is interconnected, depicted in Snow Dance. Finally, the bird transforms into energy in the photo Transformation Flight.

A sloop, "Maine Sails," photographed by du Houx off Belfast, merges into its surroundings showing how it’s geometry is reflected in nature.

A sloop, “Maine Sails,” photographed by du Houx off Belfast, merges into its surroundings showing how it’s geometry is reflected in nature.

“Throughout history scientists have observed nature to aid them with their inventions. From airplane designs to medicines nature’s inspiration has been the guide. We need to continue to observe nature and protect our natural world for all our futures,” said du Houx. Continue reading