Transformations- Revealing natures complex balance by Ramona du Houx in Portland

See the article in Maine Insights HERE.

Transitions, fine art photos by Ramona du Houx exhibited at Art House in Portland

The inside gallery at The Art House 61 Pleasant Street, Portland, features fine art photography by Ramona du Houx for the month of June, 2015.

Ramona du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Some find them nostalgic and some mystical. Many have said the images have a healing nature. See more at http://www.photographybyramonaduhoux.com.

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Ramona is currently represented by Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan and is also a member of the Maine Artist Collaborative and the Harlow Gallery. Gallery Storks has produced an art book of Ramona’s art called: Transformations— Revealing nature’s complex balance. Many of the photos on display at the Art House are in the book.

“The Greek philosopher Heraclitus wrote that you couldn’t step into the same river, twice. Today, we don’t normally see how interconnected rhythms of nature are a part of us — too many of us tend to take nature’s continual dance of life for granted.

“Scientists, innovators, and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her connective rhythms. But now society plugs us into the Internet, and while that can open doors, sometimes too much of being Internet-connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that are transformational. I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves,” said Ramona.

The photographic watercolor technique is always a challenge.

“I never know exactly what the results will be, that’s the exciting part of the creation,” said du Houx. “Sometimes when people look deeply into these images, they relax and find a tranquil place in the soul, as one would by taking time to be at peace in nature. At other times, the photographs can refresh, excite, and energize one’s soul, as if one were standing by a waterfall. The images have been said to be dreamlike, healing, Zen meditative, and thought provoking.”

Buying a piece of art is a lifelong investment. To be able to be transported to another place and time or to find peace by viewing art is a priceless experience. Often people don’t realize the time and expense artists put into their work.

“How can anyone put a price tag on the time it has taken for any artist to achieve the level of expertise they have obtained to create the work they do?” asked du Houx. “People need art, like food. Art fills the soul in a way nothing else can.”

The Art House is open: Tuesday thru Friday 10-6, Saturday 10-4, Mondays by Appointment

Legendary photographer Mary Ellen Mark leaves behind social legacy

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Photographer Mary Ellen Mark died May 25, 2015 at the age of 75. She is best known for her striking portraiture and investigative documentary work, which spanned over 40 years.

Mark’s emotional photographs capture the lives of those often overlooked and underappreciated. Her work took her around the world, from India to homeless shelters across upstate New York.

“I’m just interested in people on the edges,” she told The New York Times in a 1987 interview. “I feel an affinity for people who haven’t had the best breaks in society. I’m always on their side. I find them more human maybe. What I want to do more than anything is acknowledge their existence.” Continue reading

Rising Up: Hale Woodruff’s Murals at Talladega College a must see

nmah-woodruff

These murals represent the American spirit of freedom. The energy, emotion and power of the artist transcends time and brings history to life. This is why I need to share his work, here.

In 1938, the historically black Talladega College commissioned artist Hale Woodruff to create a series of paintings telling the story of the Amistad, when 53 Africans revolted on a Spanish ship carrying them to slavery one century earlier. A traveling exhibition organized by the High Museum in Atlanta showcases the Talladega murals, now on view at the Smithsonian. Rising Up: Hale Woodruff’s Murals at Talladega College

Though he painted the murals for a local audience of students and faculty, Woodruff intended their impact to reach beyond Talladega’s campus. Continue reading

March exhibit of du Houx: The Energy and Peace of Waterfalls

Every month Ramona hosts an exhibit in Solon and here on line. For March the exhibit is The Energy and Peace of Waterfalls.

Society moves at an ever-increasing pace; with cell phones and text messaging many people don’t take the time to look around them, to reflect. There is of course a time and place for these technologies, there is also a time and place for contemplation. Nature provides pools of wisdom in reflected objects if we take the time to look. Taking a moment or two to find stillness coupled with a rush of discovery energizes me in a balanced way. With these images I hope others will find that solace.

Water, soft and supple and rocks hard and unforgiving create a balance. They exist and form the nature of each-other. The water molds the stones, the rocks determine the waters flow. This relationship in nature we carry in our souls.

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When the ice age carved out our landscapes dramatic shifts occurred. Some were sharp, steep transitions where waterfalls were created. For me the energy from the ionizing water as it cascades over a waterfall clears my mind so I can look at challenges afresh. The rush of water awakens something deep within the soul. In my photographs I hope to convey that excited rush of creation with a balance of where the earth now resides.

Maine artist Ramona du Houx in Tokyo exhibit the book called Transformations to follow

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Article in Maine Insights by Morgan Rogers

Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan is pleased to announce Treasures showing the unique work of six artists. The gallery represents each artist.

Ramona du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Some find them nostalgic and some mystical.

“Sometimes when people look deeply into these images, they relax and find a tranquil place in the soul, as one would by taking time to be at peace in nature. At other times, the photographs can refresh, excite, and energize one’s soul, as if one were standing by a waterfall. The images have been said to be dreamlike, healing, Zen meditative, and thought provoking,” said Ramona.

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Gallery Storks is also publishing a book of Ramona’s art called, Transformations—Revealing nature’s complex balance. Some of the images in the book are in the Treasures exhibit.

Later this year the gallery will hold an exhibit solely of the work in Transformations when the book is released.

“Scientists, innovators, and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her connective rhythms. But now society plugs us into the Internet, and while that can open doors, sometimes too much of being Internet-connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that are transformational. I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves,” said du Houx.

Ramona has been “painting with the camera” since 1979, is currently is also a member of the Maine Artist Collective, http://www.maineartistcollective.com and the Harlow Gallery.

The photographic watercolor technique is always a challenge.

“I never know exactly what the results will be, that’s the exciting part of the creation,” said du Houx. “I believe every photograph has an audience, someone the work will speak to personally.”

In one’s own backyard “Spirits” can dance as they do in Ramona du Houx’s art

Spirit Dance

Spirit Dance

Long summer days give way to evenings with golden hues coating wheat, grass or grains blowing in the wind. Long shadows stretch thirty times one’s height across the land. This is the magic of Maine, just before the sun says goodnight. Tree frogs chirp serenades welcoming the night, while birds dart back and forth scooping up insects with delight.

Such was the evening I took a walk through the fields out back. Something scampered in the bushes and I felt my adrenaline rush, just Mr. Beaver collecting his dinner. We starred at each other, neither blinked. Not wanting to disturb his ambitious gnawing on the birch tree I slowly backed away. A humming bird stopped just feet away and hovered in the air, turned and sped off. I followed not knowing where she’s take me.

After racing over two hills the sun was sinking faster. The bird stopped and danced amongst the wheat. A first I tried to take images of the humming bird. I should have known better. After all, she was just leading me to my destination.

The sun coated the wheat with such golden hues I was awe struck. Then purple hues, with a twinge of green could be seen. The wind whispered across the field like waves on the ocean. Slowly, peacefully I clicked the shutter. I was running out of film so I only managed a few shots.

Once I developed them I was taken by the depth of the wheat and the grass behind. The textures and colors reminded me of the hummingbird. These images were, to me, her spirit.

Reflections, Waterfall, Rocks – zen like images by Ramona du Houx

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Society moves at an ever-increasing pace; with cell phones and text messaging many people don’t take the time to look around them, to reflect. There is of course a time and place for these technologies, there is also a time and place for contemplation. Nature provides pools of wisdom in reflected objects if we take the time to look. Taking a moment or two to find stillness coupled with a rush of discovery energizes me in a balanced way. With these images I hope others will find that solace.

Water, soft and supple and rocks hard and unforgiving create a balance. They exist and form the nature of each-other. The water molds the stones, the rocks determine the waters flow. This relationship in nature we carry in our souls.

When the ice age carved out our landscapes dramatic shifts occurred. Some were sharp, steep transitions where waterfalls were created. For me the energy from the ionizing water as it cascades over a waterfall clears my mind so I can look at challenges afresh. The rush of water awakens something deep within the soul. In my photographs I hope to convey that excited rush of creation with a balance of where the earth now resides.

Flower’s in their mystic light by Ramona du Houx

To take a photograph of a flower is obvious. To show the energy and light within that flower and how it relates to its surroundings is always the challenge. Viewing these flowers allows us to think more about life. The images can calm, excite or balance our souls by taking us away from our daily routines.

Atlantic seascapes of Maine take you into a dream world in the images by Ramona du Houx

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Our bodies consist of the same proportion of water as the earth. We are creatures of the sea. The draw of the ocean has been written about time and again. There is something more vast and more mysterious about the sea than anything else on earth. It’s something similar to the vastness and mystery of the universe itself. Our planet is just one in our solar system which is connected by the vastness of space. Is the relationship we have with the ocean a microscopic reflection of the relationship our Earth has to space?

How people interact with the ocean, from feeling at one under sail with the winds at the back to simply watching waves lap the shores, transmits a calmness, a wholeness. That peace is something I wish to convey in my work.

Trees painted with a camera by Ramona du Houx

Every month Ramona hosts an exhibit in Solon and here on line. For February the exhibit is The Magic of Trees.

Stability, strength, integrity: words we use to describe trees. From our most ancient texts trees have become symbols for people to find strength in.

How they reflect human nature, throughout the seasons, inspires me. Painting with the camera depicts their resiliency while commotion surrounds them. They remain more defined in the photographs while their surroundings have a swept away look. For me that reflects the strength of the human spirit.

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Ice storm beauty merges with the snow in a dance with photo by Ramona du Houx

Snow Dance

Snow Dance

The wonders of winter in Maine are boundless. It truly is a place where you can feel all the seasons and participate in their magical offerings year round. Sometimes, transitioning from season to season we get mixed precipitation as the weather collides and then merges creating spectacles for us to marvel in.

In the autumn of 2013 after the leaves had floated to earth, and the harvest moon said goodnight it began to rain. But as it came down the rain took hold of a upper atmospheric change and snow began to fall. Back and forth the weather played between the seasons and over the course of a week everything outside was coated in ice. When the sun finally greeted the day the ice danced in its beams of light.

The crystals sounded like wind chimes as tree branches sighed. This magical ice palace of nature’s backyard was inspiring. As I swayed with the branches trying to free themselves of their ice coats I wondered how on earth trees go through such dramatic changes. I took my photos grateful to be able to witness nature’s moods and her dance of the season’s transitions.