Maine’s Portland art museum exhibits photographs of American Indians

Screen Shot 2016-02-27 at 10.58.51 AM“Selections from the North American Indian” by Edward Curtis will be exhibited at the Portland Museum of Art from February 26th through May 29. It includes 25 photos of Indians that Curtis shot between 1907 and 1930.

The faces of the portraits say so much.

The images were first included in a book project by Curtis, “The North American Indian.” Curtis documented Indians and native culture, primarily across the American West and the Pacific Northwest. He made more than 2,000 photogravures, and his research represented the most comprehensive effort at the time to document Indian culture. He visited more than 80 tribes.

Curtis was sometimes criticized for romanticizing Indians, often asking them to wear ceremonial dress and adornments that were accurate but presented out of context. On the other hand, his work was valuable for its scope and completeness, and Curtis earned high marks for his photographic artistry.

The Portland Museum has commentary by contemporary Maine Indian artists Brenda Moore-Mitchell, George Neptune and David Moses Bridges to accompany the photographs on display. Visitors can access their remarks through audio recordings in the gallery.

Science and art at Colby College

A novel art, science, and educational collaboration is underway between Colby College and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences. Six different professors in disciplines ranging from biology to the art and humanities have integrated a photographic exhibit of marine microbes, created by Bigelow Laboratory, into their curriculum this fall.

The exhibit is on display at Colby College through December 11, and culminates in a presentation of student-inspired work that evening at 5 pm in the Wormser Room at the college.
Among the offerings, the event is scheduled to feature a microbe-inspired dance, microbial marble sculptures, scientific discussion about the relevance of marine microbes to planetary balance, and instant DNA technology.

Hillary Clinton in Maine

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Article and photos by Ramona du Houx

“We can raise incomes again — because that is the single most important issue we face. People have to feel that their work has been rewarded. Prosperity has to be broadly shared,” said Hillary Clinton, the front-runner for the Democratic nomination in the 2016 presidential race during a campaign town-hall style event in Portland, Maine.

The King Middle-School event of 400 supporters had an overflow of participants who watched on monitors in an adjoining room. Those who stood in line by 2pm, for the 4pm event, sat comfortably in a semi-circle surrounding Clinton as she outlined her comprehensive agenda— that mainly focused on incomes and job growth for the middleclass and low-income earners.

She said the way in which to achieve that growth is with Democrats, “Our country does better, our economy does better when there is a Democrat in the White House… They (Republicans) want to return to the failed politics of trickle-down economics. They want to make it easier for the super rich, and corporations to have their way. That didn’t work for America before…” Read the entire article in Maine Insights HERE.

Ramona du Houx’s Transformations fine art photography book

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From an article in the Bangor Daily News

Ramona du Houx’s fine art photography has been published by Polar Bear & Company in a book entitled Transformations- Revealing nature’s complex balance, containing 36 original works.
Du Houx uses the camera with a painter’s eye. She has exhibited internationally. In Japan she is represented by Gallery Storks of Tokyo.

“It’s unique,” said Gallery Storks owner Takafumi Suzuki. “We are honored to represent her and her new form of art.”

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The technique she discovered back in 1979 in New York uses movement to create a sense of wonder through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Everything within the viewfinder becomes more visibly interconnected, when objects merge with the motion of the camera, as the image, the “lightgraph,” is taken. Continue reading

Mario Gerth’s photos of the sons and daughters of the wind


Traveling through some of Africa’s most remote regions for months, German photographer Mario Gerth took intimate portraits that depict the last nomads and semi-nomads of an entire continent. His photographs are an homage to Africa and its people. They document, inform and preserve. His main goal is to inspire.

This collection, “Sons and Daughters of the Wind,” shows the nomads and semi-nomads of Africa living a frugal, basic and content life. The horizon is their home. They are the “children of the sun and the sons and daughters of the wind.”

It took Gerth six years in Africa on many different journeys. He spent two of those years biking from Cape Town to Cairo.

Art House show of Ramona du Houx’s photos

I’d like to thank everyone who came to the opening. It was fantastic.
And a big thank you to the Art House for showing my work! The Art House is open: Tuesday thru Friday 10-6, Saturday 10-4, Mondays by Appointment


I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves. So come to the exhibit and discover something!

Gallery Storks has produced an art book of my art called: Transformations— Revealing nature’s complex balance. Many of the photos on display at the Art House are in the book.

Sometimes, when people look deeply into these images, they relax and find a tranquil place in the soul, as one would by taking time to be at peace in nature. At other times, the photographs can refresh, excite, and energize one’s soul, as if one were standing by a waterfall. The images have been said to be dreamlike, healing, Zen meditative, and thought provoking.

The show runs until July 28th.
Email me at duhoux2@tds.net, and I’ll meet you at the gallery. Or call The Art House for an appointment:207.221.3443

Transformations- Revealing natures complex balance by Ramona du Houx in Portland

See the article in Maine Insights HERE.

Transitions, fine art photos by Ramona du Houx exhibited at Art House in Portland

The inside gallery at The Art House 61 Pleasant Street, Portland, features fine art photography by Ramona du Houx for the month of June, 2015.

Ramona du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Some find them nostalgic and some mystical. Many have said the images have a healing nature. See more at http://www.photographybyramonaduhoux.com.

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Ramona is currently represented by Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan and is also a member of the Maine Artist Collaborative and the Harlow Gallery. Gallery Storks has produced an art book of Ramona’s art called: Transformations— Revealing nature’s complex balance. Many of the photos on display at the Art House are in the book.

“The Greek philosopher Heraclitus wrote that you couldn’t step into the same river, twice. Today, we don’t normally see how interconnected rhythms of nature are a part of us — too many of us tend to take nature’s continual dance of life for granted.

“Scientists, innovators, and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her connective rhythms. But now society plugs us into the Internet, and while that can open doors, sometimes too much of being Internet-connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that are transformational. I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves,” said Ramona.

The photographic watercolor technique is always a challenge.

“I never know exactly what the results will be, that’s the exciting part of the creation,” said du Houx. “Sometimes when people look deeply into these images, they relax and find a tranquil place in the soul, as one would by taking time to be at peace in nature. At other times, the photographs can refresh, excite, and energize one’s soul, as if one were standing by a waterfall. The images have been said to be dreamlike, healing, Zen meditative, and thought provoking.”

Buying a piece of art is a lifelong investment. To be able to be transported to another place and time or to find peace by viewing art is a priceless experience. Often people don’t realize the time and expense artists put into their work.

“How can anyone put a price tag on the time it has taken for any artist to achieve the level of expertise they have obtained to create the work they do?” asked du Houx. “People need art, like food. Art fills the soul in a way nothing else can.”

The Art House is open: Tuesday thru Friday 10-6, Saturday 10-4, Mondays by Appointment

Rising Up: Hale Woodruff’s Murals at Talladega College a must see

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These murals represent the American spirit of freedom. The energy, emotion and power of the artist transcends time and brings history to life. This is why I need to share his work, here.

In 1938, the historically black Talladega College commissioned artist Hale Woodruff to create a series of paintings telling the story of the Amistad, when 53 Africans revolted on a Spanish ship carrying them to slavery one century earlier. A traveling exhibition organized by the High Museum in Atlanta showcases the Talladega murals, now on view at the Smithsonian. Rising Up: Hale Woodruff’s Murals at Talladega College

Though he painted the murals for a local audience of students and faculty, Woodruff intended their impact to reach beyond Talladega’s campus. Continue reading

Maine artist Ramona du Houx in Tokyo exhibit the book called Transformations to follow

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Article in Maine Insights by Morgan Rogers

Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan is pleased to announce Treasures showing the unique work of six artists. The gallery represents each artist.

Ramona du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Some find them nostalgic and some mystical.

“Sometimes when people look deeply into these images, they relax and find a tranquil place in the soul, as one would by taking time to be at peace in nature. At other times, the photographs can refresh, excite, and energize one’s soul, as if one were standing by a waterfall. The images have been said to be dreamlike, healing, Zen meditative, and thought provoking,” said Ramona.

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Gallery Storks is also publishing a book of Ramona’s art called, Transformations—Revealing nature’s complex balance. Some of the images in the book are in the Treasures exhibit.

Later this year the gallery will hold an exhibit solely of the work in Transformations when the book is released.

“Scientists, innovators, and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her connective rhythms. But now society plugs us into the Internet, and while that can open doors, sometimes too much of being Internet-connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that are transformational. I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves,” said du Houx.

Ramona has been “painting with the camera” since 1979, is currently is also a member of the Maine Artist Collective, http://www.maineartistcollective.com and the Harlow Gallery.

The photographic watercolor technique is always a challenge.

“I never know exactly what the results will be, that’s the exciting part of the creation,” said du Houx. “I believe every photograph has an audience, someone the work will speak to personally.”