Transformations- Revealing natures complex balance by Ramona du Houx in Portland

See the article in Maine Insights HERE.

Transitions, fine art photos by Ramona du Houx exhibited at Art House in Portland

The inside gallery at The Art House 61 Pleasant Street, Portland, features fine art photography by Ramona du Houx for the month of June, 2015.

Ramona du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Some find them nostalgic and some mystical. Many have said the images have a healing nature. See more at http://www.photographybyramonaduhoux.com.

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Ramona is currently represented by Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan and is also a member of the Maine Artist Collaborative and the Harlow Gallery. Gallery Storks has produced an art book of Ramona’s art called: Transformations— Revealing nature’s complex balance. Many of the photos on display at the Art House are in the book.

“The Greek philosopher Heraclitus wrote that you couldn’t step into the same river, twice. Today, we don’t normally see how interconnected rhythms of nature are a part of us — too many of us tend to take nature’s continual dance of life for granted.

“Scientists, innovators, and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her connective rhythms. But now society plugs us into the Internet, and while that can open doors, sometimes too much of being Internet-connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that are transformational. I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves,” said Ramona.

The photographic watercolor technique is always a challenge.

“I never know exactly what the results will be, that’s the exciting part of the creation,” said du Houx. “Sometimes when people look deeply into these images, they relax and find a tranquil place in the soul, as one would by taking time to be at peace in nature. At other times, the photographs can refresh, excite, and energize one’s soul, as if one were standing by a waterfall. The images have been said to be dreamlike, healing, Zen meditative, and thought provoking.”

Buying a piece of art is a lifelong investment. To be able to be transported to another place and time or to find peace by viewing art is a priceless experience. Often people don’t realize the time and expense artists put into their work.

“How can anyone put a price tag on the time it has taken for any artist to achieve the level of expertise they have obtained to create the work they do?” asked du Houx. “People need art, like food. Art fills the soul in a way nothing else can.”

The Art House is open: Tuesday thru Friday 10-6, Saturday 10-4, Mondays by Appointment

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Maine artist Ramona du Houx in Tokyo exhibit the book called Transformations to follow

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Article in Maine Insights by Morgan Rogers

Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan is pleased to announce Treasures showing the unique work of six artists. The gallery represents each artist.

Ramona du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Some find them nostalgic and some mystical.

“Sometimes when people look deeply into these images, they relax and find a tranquil place in the soul, as one would by taking time to be at peace in nature. At other times, the photographs can refresh, excite, and energize one’s soul, as if one were standing by a waterfall. The images have been said to be dreamlike, healing, Zen meditative, and thought provoking,” said Ramona.

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Gallery Storks is also publishing a book of Ramona’s art called, Transformations—Revealing nature’s complex balance. Some of the images in the book are in the Treasures exhibit.

Later this year the gallery will hold an exhibit solely of the work in Transformations when the book is released.

“Scientists, innovators, and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her connective rhythms. But now society plugs us into the Internet, and while that can open doors, sometimes too much of being Internet-connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that are transformational. I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves,” said du Houx.

Ramona has been “painting with the camera” since 1979, is currently is also a member of the Maine Artist Collective, http://www.maineartistcollective.com and the Harlow Gallery.

The photographic watercolor technique is always a challenge.

“I never know exactly what the results will be, that’s the exciting part of the creation,” said du Houx. “I believe every photograph has an audience, someone the work will speak to personally.”

Ramona du Houx’s December exhibit at Berry’s in Maine continues until February from popular demand


by Morgan Rogers. First published in the Magazine Maine Insights

The inside gallery at Berry’s, 153 Main St, downtown Waterville, features the artwork, Ramona du Houx. Due to popular demand the show, which started in December continues throughout January.Ramona du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Some find them nostalgic and some mystical. Many have said the images have a healing nature. See more at http://www.photographybyramonaduhoux.com.

Ramona is currently represented by Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan and is also a member of the Maine Artist Collaborative and the Harlow Gallery. She currently has another exhibit until the end of the month at the Constellation Gallery, 511 Congress Street, in Portland, Maine.

“For me art reflects where we live in our communities, as well as where an artist is in their heart, mind and soul,” said Ramona. “In 1979 I began to paint with my camera to depict the interconnectedness of nature. I took the initial results to the Museum of Modern Art in New York, where they recorded them long ago. The continuing results have been unpredictable, intriguing, and thought provoking.”

The photographic watercolor technique is always a challenge.

“I never know exactly what the results will be, that’s the exciting part of the creation,” said du Houx. “I believe every photograph has an audience, someone the work will speak to personally.” Continue reading

“Sunflower Rays” story of life by Ramona du Houx has a story

Sunflower Rays

Sunflower Rays

Every image has story of their own, a life of their own. I love sunflowers, so much I planted last years garden with them firmly in my thoughts. Of course Van Gough’s sunflowers revolve in my mind, along with the gardens Monet planted, cared for, and painted. And then there are my Chickadee’s whom, somehow make it through Maine winters, as well as the honey bees who need more safe havens to pollinate. To ease their plight, and satisfy my passion, I planted dozens of sunflowers. It turned out to be a wonderful year for their growth, and as they began to blossom I waited for the right time to dance with my camera amongst them. Alas, that time never came. I broke my wrist instead. There have been so many times, in my life, I have tried to “set” up photos only to have something else occur. It wasn’t a bad thing as it gave me time to think, and work on images already taken. Continue reading

Wild lilies are Earth Bound Angels in the story behind Ramona du Houx’s photo

Eathbound Angels

Eathbound Angels

For many photographers telling one’s F-stop, speed and lighting conditions is how they portray their story of an image they managed to record. That, indeed, is the technical side but for me the true story about the atmosphere one’s senses pick up of the day tells much more. The weather also plays the most dramatic of all roles. Inspired by the Impressionistic and Modern artists, when I take a photo I approach it as if I was doing a watercolor on rice paper, for watercolor artists can not redo their paintings. As a photographer I need a level of risk- the risk of never knowing if your timing is in sync with nature’s.

On one of the most wonderful summer days, which are now seeing me through the winter, I ventured to the Kennebec River for a walk and swim. The foliage on the riverbank was full, berries weighed down branches, milkweeds were poised to pop open. I put my toe into the water… not exactly tropical. Still, summer comes but once a year. Slowly, I took the plunge and much to my surprise found it refreshing, the day’s trials and tribulations melted from my mind as I took on the current swimming upstream. Drying off on a rock in the sun I was at peace once more.

The extremes of temperatures from the refreshing river to the baking rock steered my soul as I journeyed home. I was energized. As I rounded a bend I caught sight of a wild lily. I wondered how I managed to miss the exquisite bells on my walk to the water’s edge. The flower’s caught the sun and appeared transparent against the river’s back. So fragile, yet so strong. So vibrant yet so cold, like my swim. The wind gently swirled off the water. I moved my camera with the same direction as the wind’s song and took a series of images.

To read more stories please go here.

The story behind the poinsettia art photos Journey and Lift-off by Ramona du Houx

Journey

Journey

With the holiday season in full swing, I set my favorite Christmas flower in the window to catch the return of the light on the solstice. I always keep my Poinsettias long after the holidays are over for their internal light continues to amaze me- they simply are a marvel of science. Too often taken for granted around this time of year they are discarded with our majestic pine trees, which have given their all bringing nature inside, and giving us hope. Somehow Poinsettias have become branded with this joyous time of year, full or warmth and good cheer, and then are so easily dismissed, as if they were simply just an ornamental part of the celebrations. Few realize they continue to grow and thrive. My last plant touched the ceiling before I had to trim it down. Of course after two years it did stop flowering and the neighbors thought the leaves resembled something they weren’t… it brought the tropics to us while we had -22 outside. Believe me if you live in Maine, plants help the winter’s go by.

In the spirit of the return of the light I put Vivaldi’s Four Season’s on and admired my Poinsettia. The curvature and sharp angles seemed so perfectly matched. Touching it’s leaves, they were so thin, so delicate and it’s stems just the opposite. The flower’s reminded me of rice-paper and I wondered if an there had ever been an origami Poinsettia. It’s sensual nature energized me and made me think of hotter climates. As I pulled out my camera I felt my heartbeat pound, for no particular reason. Then, within a matter of seconds I took a dozen images hoping I was in tune with the essence of the Poinsettia.

For me still-life images of living flowers can bring an energy to the work that’s decidedly different from still- life of dead flowers. Both are wonderful but the living plants still have the power to transmit their sensuality.

To read more stories please go here.

Lift -off

Lift -off

Ramona du Houx exhibits lightgraphs at Berry’s in Waterville, Maine

By Morgan Rogers in Maine Insights

The inside gallery at Berry’s, 153 Main St, downtown Waterville, features the artwork, Ramona du Houx, until December 30, 2014.

Ramona du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Many find them nostalgic and some mystical.

Ramona is currently represented by Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan and is also a member of the Maine Artist Collaborative where she exhibits regularly at the Constellation Gallery in Portland, Maine.

Kennebec Eagle

Kennebec Eagle

“For me art reflects where we live in our communities, as well as where an artist is in their heart, mind and soul,” said Ramona. “In 1979 I began to paint with my camera to depict the interconnectedness of nature. I took the initial results to the Museum of Modern Art in New York, where they recorded them long ago. The continuing results have been unpredictable, intriguing, and thought provoking.”

The watercolor technique is always a challenge.

“I never know exactly what the results will be, that’s the exciting part of the creation,” said du Houx. “I believe every photograph has an audience, someone the work will speak to personally.”

Dream Sail

Dream Sail

Berry’s show space offers local artists a friendly venue to exhibit their work and a way to continue to grow Waterville’s creative economy. With Colby College’s new museum, and Common Street Arts, Waterville is gaining attention as a place to visit for art.

Berry’s is open Monday thru Friday from 9:00am – 5:00pm. And Saturday from 9:00-3.00pm. And until Christmas they are open on Sundays. For the full article please go here.

du Houx limited edition signed prints

arrow222I try to bring the beauty, magic and mystery of nature to viewers by amplifying nature’s essence.

Scientists, innovators, and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her connective rhythms. But now society plugs us into the Internet, and while that can open doors, sometimes too much of being Internet-connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that are transformational. I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Sometimes when people look deeply into these images, they relax and find a tranquil place in the soul, as one would by taking time to be at peace in nature. At other times, the photographs can refresh, excite, and energize one’s soul, as if one were standing by a waterfall. The images have been said to be dreamlike, healing, Zen meditative, inspiring and thought provoking.

My technique uses movement to create a sense of wonder through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Everything within the viewfinder becomes visibly interconnected when objects merge with the motion of the camera as the image, the “lightgraph,” is taken.

Putting the images into categories was extremely challenging as everything is interconnected. Please enjoy the work and check back for more additions regularly added. All images are limited editions for sale and represent over 35 years of work.

TO VIEW: Please click on the thumbnail below to see a larger version of the art work.

 

Nature reveals herself

 

There are no boundaries in nature, with everyone and everything interconnected. Where a river stops cannot be defined, nor can the end of the sky. In my lightgraphs no objects have clearly defined borders as they merge their core essences together creating visual abstracts of light.

Continue reading

Posters and postcards of Ramona du Houx’s art now available

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Many people have asked Ramona du Houx for posters and postcards of some of her photographic art work. So, Ramona has chosen three images and has printed them as 18 x 24 posters, that can be matted and framed. She picked three flower images for the 6 x 4 postcards.

Each dreamlike image, Garden, Discovery and Lilly Bells, transports the viewer into another world of tranquility, contemplation, nostalgia and balance.

“I hope they bring the balance of nature’s love back into our busy daily lives,” said Ramona. Continue reading

Postcards for every occasion of Ramona du Houx’s art

Have you every wanted to send a card that you really felt the art work expressed what you wished to say in words?

Well, here is the chance. Ramona du Houx has printed postcards of three of her favorite flower images. The cards have ample room on the back for you to write whatever you please, directly to whom you wish to send the message to. (Of course the 6 x 4 postcards do not have her name printed of the front- that’s only for the internet copywrite.)

With the price of cards and postage always going up, a particle postcard, which can be later matted and framed as art, is a great alternative.

Purchase a package of 12 postcards – three of each image – for only $12, which includes shipping and handling.

Payment can be made to paypal using the duhoux2@tds.net account or please send a check or money order to Ramona du Houx, Photography, P.O. Box 311, Solon, Maine, 04979.

Any different number combinations of the images can be made. For example if you would like 12 of one image alone or six of two images- all combinations are welcomed. Just email duhoux2@tds.net. Thank you and enjoy!

Lilly Bells

Lilly Bells

Daisy

Daisy

Soft

Soft

Ramona du Houx’s photography reflects American independent spirit in Maine Artist Collective exhibit

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America is a forever-changing nation always on the move, The new Maine Artists Collective exhibit reflects this independent spirit July 4th, 2014 – The full article in Maine Insights by Morgan Rogers

The Constellation Gallery, home of the Maine Artists Collective, is pleased to announce their Movement exhibit for July. America is a forever-changing nation– always on the move, this exhibit reflects our independent spirit. The exhibit will have works from 11 different artists on display, with their creations to marvel at, to contemplate, and to sense the world of movement in.

The Constellation Gallery has brought together unique visions of movement, which represents the diversity of the artists and their various mediums. Continue reading

Ramona du Houx’s June exhibit at Gallery Manitou in Solon, Maine

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Every month Ramona du Houx exhibits her work on her online gallery and at Gallery Manitou in Solon, Maine. Every month the theme changes reflecting the personality of the “lightgraphs,” she has chosen for the month. “Lightgraphs” are a technique she created that makes photographs resemble watercolors.

“Painting with the camera with my Lightgraphs can create the sense of being personally close to an object through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons,” said Ramona.

June’s exhibit theme is Movement.

“Movement, we take it for granted but that is what life is. Everything is constantly in motion. Our cells replicate or as a Greek philosopher, Heraclitus, once wrote, ‘You can’t step into the same river, twice,'” said du Houx. “Most of us are too busy to contemplate how much motion there is around us, and how interconnected that makes us. Recording movement, in multiple ways, is something I like to convey in my work. It’s really nature’s theater.”

“Photography can capture motion in ways no other art medium is able to. That energy can be transformational,” added Ramona.

This is June’s exhibit at Manitou in Solon, Maine dedicated to Motion.